JRF’s #28 – The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer

I have been listening to this audio book in my car on the way to and from work for the last six months or so.  Here is what I have learned:

– Dietrich Bonhoeffer was incredibly smart

– Dietrich Bonhoeffer was incredibly passionate about Christ

– I am not a audial learner

Not only did I find that I retain far less information by hearing it than by reading it (and making notes), but the 5 minute drive to and from work is not enough to saturate in the information.  This is a book that requires much mental chewing and spiritual digestion.  Bonhoeffer is very philosophical in his approach and this left me lost very often and a few times wondering if his philosophical conclusions were scripturally solid, although I wasn’t able to keep pace with his reasoning most of the time so to question the conclusion without following the path may not be wise.

The few nuggets I did retain however made it all worthwhile.  The large portion of the book that is an exposition of the Sermon on the Mount I appreciated as Bonhoeffer forces the reader to take seriously the demands of Jesus to live out the values of His Kingdom.  Bonhoeffer stresses the “spontaneous obedience” that Christ expects of His followers.  We are not to question, debate, or ignore Christ’s commands.  We are to obey them immediately.  Simple and clear, but so often I (and most of us) quickly find excuses not to immediately and literally obey Christ’s clear commands – and yet still have the nerve to call myself a faithful disciple.

In many aspects the book reminded me of David Platt’s Radical – except for German PH.D students.

For these reasons and more (especially the extraordinary life of Bonhoeffer)  I am compelled to dig into the hard copy in the future.

 

About JRF 156 Articles
A broken sinner saved by the gracious work of Jesus Christ. Husband to the greatest woman of all time. Seriously. Father of 4. I enjoy surfing, SCUBA, basketball, and exploring. I also like to read and write and want to get better at both.

2 Comments on JRF’s #28 – The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  1. Do. The first time I attempted it, I was able to read at most a page or two before stopping and thinking about what Bonhoeffer was saying. It’s a deep and dense book that does not work when read aloud. All of his books are like that, which is odd considering that he lived anything but a life of leisurely contemplation. It must have been incredibly frustrating to his students to hear one ponderous (in the literal sense) idea after another spoken and lost.

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